Montecillo Rioja: Great Value. Great Vino (Not Virginian)

I’ve been writing about Rioja a lot these days. Maybe that’s what inspired the good folks at Bodegas Montecillo to send me two bottles from their winery in Rioja Alta, Spain. I received a 2007 Montecillo Crianza ($12) and a 2003 Reserva ($18). I’m glad I did; these were great wines, and the QPR can’t be beat.

PS – Different Montecillo

The 2007 Montecillo Crianza, made from 100% Tempranillo, is aged in French oak (which is a bit unusual; most Spanish wines are aged in American wood), for twelve months. The remainder of its aging takes place in bottle. The 2007 had a nose of blueberry, blackberry and plum. Medium-bodied, with a smooth mouthfeel and nice balance, and flavors of tobacco, dark chocolate, blackberry and a bit of forest floor. If, in your shopping travels, you happen to stumble upon this one, at $12/bottle, there should really be no hesitation in picking it up.

Older and Wiser

The 2003 Montecillo Reserva – a step up from the Crianza but also made from 100% Tempranillo – is aged for 18 months in untoasted French barriques (again, a twist on traditional Spanish Rioja winemaking). I picked up aromas of tobacco, cigar, clove, allspice and blackberry; and flavors fresh, wet loam, blackberry, some tertiary components like forest floor, and even a bit of oregano. Although I sensed more heat on this than the Crianza, the overall presentation was smoother and richer, with a long, lingering finish. If you’re willing to part with a few extra dollars, this one is definitely worth the money, as well.

 

In fact, this review has made me a bit thirsty. Good thing the Bodegas Montecillo Riojas are pretty easy to find

 

 

 

I’ve been writing about Rioja a lot these days. Maybe that’s what inspired the good folks at Bodegas Montecillo to send me two bottles from their winery in Rioja Alta, Spain. I received a 2007 Montecillo Crianza ($12) and a 2003 Reserva ($18). I’m glad I did; these were great wines, and the QPR can’t be beat.

PS – Different MontecilloThe 2007 Montecillo Crianza, made from 100% Tempranillo, is aged in French oak (which is a bit unusual; most Spanish wines are aged in American wood), for twelve months. The remainder of its aging takes place in bottle. The 2007 had a nose of blueberry, blackberry and plum. Medium-bodied, with a smooth mouthfeel and nice balance, and flavors of tobacco, dark chocolate, blackberry and a bit of forest floor. If, in your shopping travels, you happen to stumble upon this one, at $12/bottle, there should really be no hesitation in picking it up.

Older and WiserThe 2003 Montecillo Reserva – a step up from the Crianza but also made from 100% Tempranillo – is aged for 18 months in untoasted French barriques (again, a twist on traditional Spanish Rioja winemaking). I picked up aromas of tobacco, cigar, clove, allspice and blackberry; and flavors fresh, wet loam, blackberry, some tertiary components like forest floor, and even a bit of oregano. Although I sensed more heat on this than the Crianza, the overall presentation was smoother and richer, with a long, lingering finish. If you’re willing to part with a few extra dollars, this one is definitely worth the money, as well.

In fact, this review has made me a bit thirsty. Good thing the Bodegas Montecillo Riojas are pretty easy to find…

Posted on by Arianna Armstrong in Arianna's Wine Tasting Notes

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